Gas Inventories Exceed 3Tcf, Injection Misses Low

Gas Inventories Exceed 3Tcf, Injection Misses Low

Natural gas storage inventories increased 78 Bcf for the week ending September 6, according to the EIA’s weekly report. This is lower than the market expectation, which was an injection of 82 Bcf.

Working gas storage inventories now sit at 3.019 Tcf, which is 393 Bcf above inventories from the same time last year and 77 Bcf below the five-year average.

Prior to the storage report release, the October 2019 contract was trading at $2.525/MMBtu, roughly $0.027 lower than yesterday’s close. Prices rose post report to $2.559/MMBtu, but could not hold. At the time of writing, the October 2019 contract was trading at $2.549/MMBtu.

At the start of the injection season, the market was at a storage deficit compared to both last year and the five-year average. At the start of injection season for summer 2019, storage inventories sat at 1,107 Bcf. This inventory level was 276 Bcf below 2018 and 544 Bcf below the five-year average. However, increased production year over year has been able to help get the market out of the deficit. Last year, lower-48 dry gas production averaged 82.98 Bcf/d from April to August, while this year production has averaged 89.59 Bcf/d for the same time frame. This production increase, coupled with mild weather at the beginning of the summer season, allowed for larger injections during summer 2019. By the end of August, inventories were well past last year’s levels, and they are gaining on the five-year average. The largest regional deficit that remains is in the South Central/Gulf region, which was 51 Bcf behind the five-year average at the end of August.

Looking forward, September is expected to remain above-average in terms of temperature, causing above-average CDDs and power burn. In the 10- to 15-day range, temperatures are expected to show more seasonal cooling. October is also currently expected to have above-average temperatures. However, above-average temperatures in October can have a bearish impact as HDDs are lower, causing lower heating demand and more supply in the market.

See the chart below for the projections of the end-of-season storage inventories as of November 1, the end of the injection season.

This Week in Fundamentals

The summary below is based on Bloomberg’s flow data and DI analysis for the week ending September 12, 2019.

Supply:

  • Dry production decreased 0.47 Bcf/d on the week. Most of the decrease came from the Mountain region (-0.41 Bcf/d), where North Dakota production dropped 0.14 Bcf/d and Colorado production fell 0.17 Bcf/d.
  • Canadian imports increased 0.12 Bcf/d on the week.

Demand:

  • Domestic natural gas demand dropped 0.76 Bcf/d week over week. Power demand accounted for most of the decrease, falling 0.62 Bcf/d. Res/Com demand decreased 0.06 Bcf/d, while Industrial demand decreased 0.08 Bcf/d.
  • LNG exports fell 0.22 Bcf/d, while Mexican exports decreased 0.06 Bcf/d.

Total supply decreased 0.35 Bcf/d while total demand decreased 0.65 Bcf/d week over week. With the decrease in demand outpacing the decrease in supply, expect the EIA to report a stronger injection next week. The ICE Financial Weekly Index report is currently expecting an injection of 87 Bcf. Last year, the same week saw an injection of 86 Bcf; the five-year average is an injection of 86 Bcf.

Prices Slip Despite the Withdrawal in Crude and Petroleum Stocks

Prices Slip Despite the Withdrawal in Crude and Petroleum Stocks

US crude oil stocks posted a decrease of 6.9 MMBbl from last week. Gasoline inventories decreased 0.7 MMBbl and distillate inventories increased 2.7 MMBbl. Yesterday afternoon, API reported a large crude oil draw of 7.2 MMBbl, alongside a gasoline draw of 4.5 MMBbl and a distillate build of 0.6 MMBbl. Analysts were expecting a smaller crude oil draw of 2.6 MMBbl. The most important number to keep an eye on, total petroleum inventories, posted a decrease of 3.1 MMBbl. For a summary of the crude oil and petroleum product stock movements, see the table below.

US crude oil production remained unchanged last week, per the EIA. Crude oil imports were down 0.2 MMBbl/d last week, to an average of 6.7 MMBbl/d. Refinery inputs averaged 17.5 MMBbl/d (114 MBbl/d more than last week’s average), leading to a utilization rate of 95.1%. Prices slides down despite of the large crude draw and total petroleum stocks withdrawal. Prompt-month WTI was trading down $1.41/Bbl, at $55.99/Bbl, at the time of writing.

Prices have been on an upward trend since last week following a couple of consecutive weeks of declining crude inventories as well as heightened tensions in the Middle East after Yemeni troops launched missile attacks against Saudi troops, an incident that could complicate US-Iran relations as well. Prices last week also got support from comments by the Chinese Commerce Ministry that US and Chinese officials would meet in October to resume the negotiations on the ongoing trade disputes on import duties and intellectual property rights. However, the uncertainty around this issue and its impact on global economic health have been pressuring prices and will continue to do so until a deal is officially announced by both parties.

The rally in prices continued at the beginning of the week as crude futures rose to their highest settlement in nearly six weeks, following the comments from Saudi Arabia’s new energy minister on Saudi Arabi and OPEC’s commitment to supply cuts and balancing the market. The new Saudi energy minister, Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman, who replaced Khalid al-Falih, said the Kingdom will stay committed to the supply cuts to keep the oil supply tight. The price reaction to this news was positive as the market anticipates that Saudi Arabia will remain committed to increasing prices in order for a successful IPO of Saudi Aramco. The OPEC+ deal’s joint ministerial monitoring committee will meet on Thursday in Abu Dhabi. The market will be closely watching any outcome from this meeting in terms of any announcement on the supply cuts. The expectation will be the continuation of supply curbs by the group in order to increase prices in a market where demand continues to deteriorate.

Although the bullish sentiment has increased over the past week due to Middle East tensions and Saudi Arabia’s willingness to balance the market, the price rally had a brief pause on Tuesday after the departure of US National Security Adviser John Bolton. Bolton’s departure raised the possibility of easing tensions with Iran, which potentially could lead to the US lifting the Iranian oil sanctions, thus increasing the oil supply in the market.

The recent bullish sentiment from Saudi Arabia and rising tensions in Middle East as well as the uncertainty around the US–China trade war will continue to keep prices volatile in the near term. The recent range between $53.00 and $58.00 that held prices last week may hold in the coming week without developments on the US–China trade disputes and an unexpected outcome from the JMMC meeting in Abu Dhabi. The long-term range between $50.00 and $61.00 will likely hold trade without significant resolution of the trade wars or additional reductions in OPEC output. The longer the market stays in this tight range, the more likely significant volatility will occur when it breaks out of the range, either up or down.

Petroleum Stocks Chart

Enverus Unveils Operator Intelligence, Delivering ‘Unprecedented and Unparalleled’ Insight on 180 Oil and Gas Producers

Austin, TX (September 11, 2019) – Enverus, the leading oil and gas SaaS and analytics company, today unveiled Operator Intelligence — executive-level research reports covering hundreds of notable public and private upstream oil and gas operators. The new tool draws from Enverus’ world-class datasets to deliver benchmarking and trend analysis while telling clear, compelling stories that capture the nuance of each operator. Live, curated workspaces accompany the reports and enable readers to quickly dive deeper and interact with our broader Enverus Drillinginfo platform.

“Until now, there was no easy way to quickly access up-to-date, aggregated summaries of the hundreds of public and private E&Ps,” said Colin Westmoreland, Senior Vice President & General Manager of Market Research at Enverus. “Executives across the energy value chain have been asking for a high-value research product like this, and we’ve delivered. We’re excited to help the industry’s key decision makers by adding context to our differentiated datasets and providing faster answers to some of their most important questions.”

“Operator Intelligence offers objective analysis that can be digested quickly, without hardly any technology learning curve. All users need to do is enter a company name and launch a search. In one click or tap, they’ll have access to a full research report,” added Westmoreland.

Examples of questions answered by Operator Intelligence include:

  • Where, exactly, is an operator’s position located? How good is their acreage?
  • How was the position built? Were M&A transactions cheap or expensive?
  • What landing zones is an operator targeting? How does each perform relative to peers?
  • Is productivity improving or declining?
  • Have private equity-backed operators improved performance since acquiring and assuming operatorship of their assets?
  • How are operators changing behaviors, and why?

Andy McConn, the principal analyst behind Operator Intelligence, is excited to maintain the momentum, continue to evolve the product, and add value to our industry’s decision-making process. “A lot of compelling analysis easily falls out of Enverus’ powerful product suite, but we don’t intend to rest on our laurels with this first iteration. We’re excited to build out more forward-looking, economics-based research and get to the heart of our customers’ needs.”

Operator Intelligence sits inside a suite of other value-add products that work across several of Enverus’ platforms. The full suite of Operator Intelligence products will scale and evolve alongside Enverus’ broader analytics ecosystem and is the latest solution under the Enverus Drillinginfo business unit.

This two-minute video demonstrates how oil and gas executives can utilize the new Operator Intelligence tools from Enverus to obtain critical and timely information on more than 180 oil and gas producers.

Members of the media interested in a sample of Operator Intelligence should contact Jon Haubert with the name(s) of the company or companies they are requesting.

The Week Ahead For Crude Oil, Gas and NGLs Markets – September 9, 2019

The Week Ahead For Crude Oil, Gas and NGLs Markets – September 9, 2019

CRUDE OIL

  • US crude oil inventories posted a decrease of 4.8 MMBbl last week, according to the weekly EIA report. Gasoline and distillate inventories decreased 2.4 MMBbl and 2.5 MMBbl, respectively. Total petroleum inventories posted a decline of 4.9 MMBbl. US crude oil production decreased 100 MBbl/d from the week before, per EIA, while crude oil imports were up 0.9 MMBbl/d, to an average of 6.9 MMBbl/d.
  • The WTI market opened the week falling on its face, as traders felt the impact of the US imposing 15% tariffs on some Chinese products and China placing new duties on US crude. Adding to this negativity was the US manufacturing data, which showed activity declining in August for the first time in three years.
  • The market regained support on economic data showing continued resilience in China’s manufacturing and service sectors. Support was further bolstered by the announcement that the US and China have agreed to resume face-to-face negotiations in October. However, this support remains tepid at best.
  • The key thing for the crude market is the deterioration of demand conditions globally. As such, the ongoing trade war between the world’s two largest economies will continue to put a damper on market sentiment. Currently, there is little support to had from the supply side given the historically low production from Venezuela and Iran, as well as from the OPEC+ countries as they continue to hem in supply. A meeting of the OPEC+ Joint Ministerial Monitoring Committee will be held in Abu Dhabi this Thursday to discuss the supply issues, but the market is focusing on the gloomy economic outlook. Ahead of the meeting, incoming Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz reaffirmed the Kingdom’s commitment to the production cuts.
  • The EIA inventory release brought some support to prices and printed the highs of the week, but prices could not hold and retraced most of the gains by the end of the day. There was less pressure on prices from the US dollar, as the dollar consolidated lower after a large run in the previous week.
  • The CFTC report released Friday (dated September 3) showed the Managed Money long sector (speculating on higher prices) reducing positions by 8,584 contracts, while the short position increased by 5,501 contracts. The lack of directional commitment from the speculative sector was confirmed with the second-largest open interest position in the report, currently held by the Managed Money Spreading component (spreading occurs when a trader is long/short one month, with the opposite position in a later month). This activity can be considered a low-risk trade while waiting for a directional lead.
  • Prices expanded the range to $4.82 last week, but market internals continue to point to a neutral bias. Volume gained week over week, while open interest increased slightly. Prices remain in a consolidation phase and are bunching up around several commonly traded areas: 1) the 20-week moving average at $57.23, 2) the 200-day moving average at $56.06, and 3) the 50-day moving average at $56.27.
  • The recent range between $53.00 and $58.00 that held prices last week may hold in the coming week without developments on trade. The long-term range between $50.00 and $61.00 will likely hold trade without significant resolution on the trade wars or additional reductions in OPEC output. The longer the market stays in this tight range, the more likely significant volatility will occur when it breaks out of the range, either up or down.

NATURAL GAS

  • Natural gas dry production showed an increase of 0.05 Bcf/d, while Canadian imports decreased 0.40 Bcf/d.
  • Res/Com demand decreased 0.03 Bcf/d, while power demand rose 1.75 Bcf/d with the late summer heat. Industrial demand was up on the week, gaining 0.02 Bcf/d. Secondary components had LNG exports declining by 0.51 Bcf/d, while Mexican exports lost 0.05 Bcf/d. LNG facilities shed some demand for natural gas last week, but the new facilities will support prices this fall.
  • These events left the totals for the week showing the market increasing 0.45 Bcf/d in total supply while total demand increased by 1.2 Bcf/d.
  • The storage report last week showed the injections for the previous week at 84 Bcf. Total inventories are now 383 Bcf higher than last year and 82 Bcf below the five-year average. Current weather forecasts in the near term (coming week) show above-average temperatures throughout the US.
  • The CFTC report released last week (dated September 3) provides additional evidence that the speculative trade may be changing some of its expectations. The Managed Money short position covered their short exposure by 25,375 contracts, while the long position increased by 10,777 contracts. The chart below displays the number of short positions covered by the Managed Money short sector from its recent historical level (second only to November ’15).

  • While the short covering will cause prices to rally, long-term price runs will need not only short covering but also new length entering the market. To date, the majority of the gains in price have been attributable to the short covering. The other issue the market will potentially need to address is the total amount of short positions that it could be forced to cover and the potential volatility that covering will likely produce.
  • With the price gains last week, the market internals maintained a neutral bias as volume increased on the gains in price. Total open interest also increased slightly week over week (according to preliminary data from the CME).
  • The fundamentals (weather forecasts) may allow for additional price strength in the coming week. History shows that there is price weakness in early September, but this year seems to be contrary. The gains of last week have set up an interesting struggle for near-term action. Prices are currently running up on key resistance from the breakdown last May, when prices broke below the key support (at that time), between $2.52 and $2.49. That area will likely bring some selling this week. A break above that area will take prices to the 200-day moving average ($2.629), potentially disavowing the bearish sentiment that has held the market for the past three months. Should prices retrace and challenge support, then the key area is between $2.26 and $2.24, which will likely bring buying.

NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS

  • Ethane was up $0.010 to $0.180, propane was relatively flat on the week at $0.425, normal butane was up $0.013 to $0.490, isobutane was up $0.017 to $0.564, and natural gasoline was up $0.010 to $0.997.
  • US propane stocks increased ~2.86 MMBbl for the week ending August 30. Stocks now sit at 97.02 MMBbl, roughly 23.62 MMBbl and 17.12 MMBbl higher than the same week in 2018 and 2017, respectively.

SHIPPING

  • US waterborne imports of crude oil fell for the week ending September 6, according to Enverus’s analysis of manifests from US Customs & Border Patrol. As of September 9, aggregated data from customs manifests suggested that overall waterborne imports decreased 300 MBbl/d from the previous week. PADD 1 and PADD 5 both fell, with PADD 1 down by more than 100 MBbl/d and PADD 5 down by 290 MBbl/d. PADD 3 imports rose slightly, up 92 MBbl/d.

  • Imports from Iraq were significant this week, the highest weekly total since January. Though imports were high, the destination for Iraqi crude within the US has shifted. In 2018, the majority of Iraqi crude went to PADD 3, the Gulf Coast. In 2019, PADD 5 has been the primary destination for Iraqi crude, as it was this week. Valero’s refineries on the West Coast have become bigger consumers of Iraqi crudes, with both Wilmington and Benicia taking deliveries several times in 2019. This was a rarity in 2017 and 2018.

Gas Injection Exceeds Market Expectation, Prices Fall

Gas Injection Exceeds Market Expectation, Prices Fall

Natural gas storage inventories increased 84 Bcf for the week ending August 30, according to the EIA’s weekly report. This is higher than the market expectation, which was an injection of 76 Bcf.

Working gas storage inventories now sit at 2.941 Tcf, which is 383 Bcf above inventories from the same time last year and 82 Bcf below the five-year average.

Prior to the storage report release, the October 2019 contract was trading at $2.426/MMBtu, roughly $0.019 lower than yesterday’s close. However, prices continued to fall post report, and at the time of writing were trading at $2.400/MMBtu.

Since last Thursday, prices have gained ~$0.10/MMBtu. The main driver of the price increase is the weather forecast. September temperatures are expected to be above average in the South/South Central, driving higher than normal power burn demand. Additionally, Hurricane Dorian shifted course as the storm headed toward the lower 48. Dorian, which made landfall in the Bahamas last weekend, then turned north to move up the East Coast. This change in path caused less rain and cooling in the southeastern portion of the US, and didn’t impact power demand as drastically as if the storm had trended inland. In the coming days, Dorian is expected to bring wind and rain to the Carolinas before traveling back into the Atlantic.

See the chart below for the projections of the end-of-season storage inventories as of November 1, the end of the injection season.

This Week in Fundamentals

The summary below is based on Bloomberg’s flow data and Enverus analysis for the week ending September 5, 2019.

Supply:

  • Dry production didn’t see much movement week over week, decreasing 0.03 Bcf/d on the week.
  • Canadian imports increased 0.39 Bcf/d on the week.

Demand:

  • Domestic natural gas demand gained 1.22 Bcf/d week over week. Power demand accounted for nearly the entire change in demand week over week, increasing 1.22 Bcf/d. Res/Com demand decreased 0.01 Bcf/d, while Industrial demand gained 0.02 Bcf/d.
  • LNG exports fell 0.44 Bcf/d, mainly due to decreased exports at Sabine Pass. Mexican exports remained relatively flat on the week, gaining only 0.05 Bcf/d.

Total supply increased 0.36 Bcf/d, while total demand increased 0.88 Bcf/d week over week. With demand outpacing supply, expect the EIA to report a slightly weaker injection next week. The ICE Financial Weekly Index report is currently expecting an injection of 82 Bcf. Last year, the same week saw an injection of 69 Bcf; the five-year average is an injection of 78 Bcf.